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Acute response of serum cortisol to different intensities of resisted exercise in the elderly

Abstract

Background

Cortisol has a main role in stress response and high stress can affect the psychological and physical performance in the elderly.

Aim

To determine the acute response of serum cortisol to different intensities of resisted exercise in the elderly.

Patients and methods

A total of 60 elderly patients from both sexes (60–70 years) were equally and randomly assigned to three resistive training bouts: low-intensity (group A, 30% of 1RM), moderate-intensity (group B, 50% of 1RM), and high-intensity (group C, 80% of 1RM) with a 90–120 s rest period between sets. Blood samples that were analyzed included serum cortisol hormone before and 15 min postintervention.

Results

There was a statistically significant decrease in serum cortisol level in groups A and B at postintervention when compared with the preintervention value, while group C showed an insignificant difference.

Conclusion

In a sample of elderly patients undergoing three bouts of different intensities of resisted exercise, a low to moderate resisted exercise was superior to high intensity in decreasing the serum cortisol and consequently less stress post-exercise.

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Correspondence to Mona M. Taha PhD.

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Taha, M., Mounir, K. Acute response of serum cortisol to different intensities of resisted exercise in the elderly. Bull Fac Phys Ther 24, 20–25 (2019). https://doi.org/10.4103/bfpt.bfpt_13_18

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Keywords

  • aging
  • cortisol
  • exercise training